Anton Batagov

piano

Russian composer and pianist Anton Batagov has been described as one of the most influential Russian composers and performers of our time.

A graduate of the Gnessin School and the Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory and prize-winner at the International Tchaikovsky Competition (1986) and other competitions, Batagov introduced the music of John Cage, Morton Feldman, Steve Reich, and Philip Glass to Russian audiences. His debut CD, a 160-minute recording of Olivier Messiaen’s Vingt regards sur l’Enfant Jesus (Melodiya, 1990, 3 CD set), became a major sensation. Three years later a well-known American musicologist Richard Kostelanetz characterized Batagov’s 1993 recording of Bach’s “The Art of the Fugue” as “the most stunning interpretation of Bach since Glenn Gould.”

His concert appearances and recordings have consistently been defining moments discussed by a broad audience and the press. His interpretations of Bach, Schubert, Beethoven, Messiaen, Ravel, composers of the Russian avant-garde and those of the post avant-garde, distinguish themselves with expert knowledge of performing traditions and the history of culture. At the same time, they have radically changed habitual conceptions about these works, and even of the very foundations of musical art. The influences of Batagov’s concert and studio work on the understanding of classical and new music and on the artistic tendencies in Russia has been tremendous.

Some of his works written since the late 1990’s have been deeply influenced by Buddhist philosophy and practice. He has composed a number of major works based on ancient Buddhist texts chanted by Tibetan lamas as well as several large-scale instrumental compositions inspired by Buddhist teachings.

Since the early 2000s, Anton Batagov has been seen not only as a successor of the post-minimalist tradition, but as a one-of-a-kind composer / musician / thinker. His multifaceted work and spiritual experience are unique. His views and principles are as unorthodox as they are clear and convincing.

In 2009 Anton Batagov received the prestigious national Steppenwolf Award in the Best Music category.

In 2009, after twelve years of seclusion, he returned to live performances. Since then, he has been performing a series of unique solo piano recital programs. The critics call his recitals “a revelation”, “a work of enlightened person”.

(Extracted from Anton Batagov website)